3 fire festivals in Tottori and Shimane you should not miss

In Japan, Tottori and Shimane often get a bad rap. The shinkansen doesn’t go there so they must be pretty backwater places. Au contraire, my friend, au contraire!  There’s always something going on, if you know where to look. Like other prefectures in Japan, Tottori and Shimane have their own quirky light and fire festivals. Here are 3 festivals you should not miss!

Daisen Fire Festivalwww.hotfoottrini.com

 

1. Daisen Natsuyama Festival

Mountain worship is serious business in Japan. Every June, Mount Daisen, Tottori’s most popular hiking destination, hosts the Natsuyama Festival to bless the summer hiking season. During the two-day festival, Shinto priests from Ogamiyama Shrine pray for the safety of the hikers. On the first day, there’s a torch procession from the shrine to the car park. Get there early to snag a good viewing spot. The path will be bumpy and slippery with moss in some places. The stairs leading up to the shrine are also a bit steep. At the shrine, grab a bamboo torch. Then join the procession. It will look like a river of fire coursing down the foot of the mountain. People will be taking selfies so look out for flames coming your way in any direction.matsue

2. Lantern Festival, Matsue Castle

Looking for a more raucous affair? Every autumn, Matsue Castle in Shimane prefecture hosts a taiko festival called Do Gyoretsu and a lantern festival known as Suitouro. The festivals re-enact the celebrations when Princess Iwa-hime of the Japanese Imperial Family came to Matsue to marry Lord Nobuzumi Matsudaira in 1724.  Take a turn hitting the taiko drums on one of many miyazukuri or drum floats. For the lantern festival, participants place paper lanterns on the castle grounds and along the darkened streets and Ohashi river. Spend the evening wading through a sea of lanterns depicting scenes from ancient and contemporary Japan and other parts of the world.

Misasa Fire Festivalwww.hotfoottrini.com

3. Hono no Saiten, Misasa

Feeling particularly brave? In October, head to Sanbutsuji in Misasa. Don a hachimaki headband and walk on freshly-charred logs during the Festival of Flames in central Tottori. Before you get a go, Shugendo priests will stride over the embers in tabi (Japanese socks), rope sandals, or naked soles. Like climbing Mount Mitoku, firewalking is an ancient Shugendo tradition designed to train the spirit and to “ward off evil and invite good fortune.” After you cross the fire, you can chomp on some free, ooey-gooey mochi (rice cake).

Photos: © Live Lyfe Photography and Hot Foot Trini

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